Johnson, Philip (1906 - 2005)

Architect and critic. He was a student of Gropius and Breuer at Harvard, graduating in 1943. He twice headed the Architecture Department at the Museum of Modern Art, where he and Henry-Russell Hitchcock curated the Modern Architecture: International Exhibition in 1932 and published The International Style both of which helped to define modern architecture for generations of Americans. He also curated a seminal exhibition on Mies van der Rohe in 1947. He commissioned Breuer's House in the Museum Garden and also tried, unsuccessfully, to exhibit Breuer's Cambridge War Memorial in that same garden. He left the Museum in 1954 to enter into practice, partnering with Richard Foster, John Burgee and Alan Ritchie over the course of his career. Among Johnson's most famous buildings are his Glass House in New Canaan, Conn., the AT&T (now Sony) Building, and the interiors he designed for Mies van der Rohe's Seagram Building. He received the A.I.A.'s Gold Medal in 1978 and the Pritzker Prize in 1979.

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War Memorials: What Aesthetic Price Glory?
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